About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
yesterday. the army-navy showdown a classic. vice-president biden gets things underway with a coin toss and navy would open up the scoring, not to be outdone, army comes right back, and the quarterback with the 11 yard up the middle keeper there. and just out to the fourth. and navy down three, they go ahead with four minutes to go. and then two minutes left and as if things weren't tight enough. army with the winning score and they hand off and navy recovers with a 17-13 win and so broken up, crying, he had to be consoled by four star general, and navy has now beaten army. and you thought that college football was over for the year. >> what a great event. i live in phillies and friday nights in the city is filled with people and army thought they had it, but 11 straight. >> clayton: come on, army. let's check in with maria in for rick. >> good morning, everyone, we'll see a big shift in the weather pattern we've seen the last several weeks, very mild across the country and temperatures above average and enjoying basically very mild conditions for late fall and also early december, but
at the army navy club here in washington, d.c., and it is a great pleasure to have with us today some of our real national treasures. and certainly lieutenant colonel, promotable trantor is among them -- j. b. vowell is among them. the tenant colonel vowell commander province called task force no slack which i think is really a phenomenal italian name, and also think it was a phenomenal italian -- [inaudible] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who
, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipline back there. i appreciate the fact that we drill that into our personnel that don't point anything you don't want to shoot at. because there's one point i was actually in our little van behind a truckload of soldiers and there were a lot of automatic weapons, everybody with fingers on the triggers and muzzles going everywhere and i'm, look, can we just back off a little bit? let's not tailgate quite so much, please. i
ahead of it. >> reporter: just this week, the navy tested its next generation drone, which could carry bombs and lands on an aircraft carrier with hardly any human control. the directive only applies to lethal systems. it still allows the military to develop autonomous spy planes. >> as we begin to approach the possibility of having machines select and engage targets, we want to be very careful not to cross that line without high-level policy review. >> reporter: human rights watcher applauds the pentagon's move. >> we don't believe it solves the problem, however. >> reporter: so the group is calling for governments to ban autonomous weapons outright. bonnie points to syria and wonders what killer robots could do in a conflict like that. >> because the weapons are emotionless, they could serve as a perfect tool for a dictator who would not have to worry about the danger of a human soldier turning on him if ordered to fire on his own civilians. a robot would not do that. >> reporter: when you're talking about a weapon that doesn't have the capacity to feel any compassion for its victims
. the u.s. navy has moved two warships into the area. what do you make of it? >> they are vntsing their military and the pentagon and the united states military will always take that seriously. our intelligence services, of course, are trying to measure their intent. a the loof this intent has to do with their political influence in the region. they want to be on a stage that gives them prestige. from that, they usually get concessions from the south koreans. >> is this one of those petulent children acting up, trying to get attention? or do you think there is a legitimate threat from the long-range missile? >> there is a threat to the region, to be sure t. can reach alaska and eventually, develop a missile to reach islands of hawaii to be sure. we take that capability seriously. this is a road regime, the number-1 road regime in the world. as much as they have been there a long time and done nothing in terms ever conducting operations in the south and provoking another war, we do take them seriously, as we should. >> i want to talk to you about egypt, a lot of news out thereof. p
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)